Posts Tagged ‘select’

Injury Risk & Prevention

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Baseball & Softball athletes deal with an increase risk of injury due to the constant strain the game puts on their bodies. From planting, rotating, exploding, stabilizing, core activation, and arm whip their bodies are constantly being challenged to stay healthy.   We have refocused on injury prevention for our athletes as we launch the Extreme’s 17th year.

 

Professionals brought in through the Extreme Network have been brainstorming on the trends of our sport & the strengths and weaknesses of our Midwest athletes. They have created a standardized warm-up system that is tailored for our program goals and needs.   The depth of professional input that was used to create these standards is a first for our program on this large of a scale.   Our program now benefits from a professionally designed program with 2 purposes: 1) to increase our athletes’ velocity and 2) to decrease their risk for injury.

Extreme Baseball and Softball teams go through a consistent warm-up that progresses and reinforces movement and athletic positions that every viable and healthy baseball or softball athlete need to enjoy years of competition.

The Extreme Baseball & Softball Warm-up System focuses on increasing the temperature of the muscles to increase the speed of nerve impulses, making our athletes faster. They will also experience an increase in range of motion at the joints reducing the risk of tearing muscle & ligaments.
Here are the basic themes of the warm-up that all of our athletes complete:

  1. Increase Heart Rate
  2. Dynamic Stretch
    1. After we increase the heart rate and pulse the muscle temperature has increased and are more elastic, reducing the risk of injury.
  3. Agility & Coordination
    1. Agility requires a combination of balance, speed, strength, & coordination.   After our dynamic stretch athletes are primed to work on increasing their rhythm and output in these areas.girls
  4. Shoulder/Rotator Cuff warm-up prior to throwing
    1. Increase blood flow to the shoulder prior to throwing reduces the risk of injury.
  5. Throwing Progression with focus points on mechanic efficiency + proper force and inertia increase as quantity of throws increase.
    1. Many athletes come out and throw the ball as hard as they can from the start. Doing this increases their potential risk for injury greatly. By taking our athletes through a progression with focus points around mechanics, force, velocity, and timing we build healthy habitual habits they will lean on for years to come.
  6. Cool down for our athletes includes mobility focused stretching + flush exercises to help increase range of motion and recovery.
    1. Mobility and flexibility of the joints, muscle tissue, ligaments and tendons surrounding the joint is crucial for maintaining a healthy body that can withstand large quantity of reps and temperature changes prevalent in the mid-west.

Our game is being increasingly challenged to be safer. The Extreme Baseball & Softball Warm-up System will be one solution for our coaches and players to increase our athlete’s safety.

 

Hard Ball Talks – Special Guest Cindy Zelinsky

CindyHard Ball Talks
Date: September 28, 2015
Guest:  Cindy Zelinsky, owner of Absolute College Consulting.  You can learn more about Cindy and her college preparation programs at www.absolutecollegeconsulting.com.
Topic:  Cindy’s experiences as an educator, collegiate coach and parent have provided her a unique perspective on the process of finding the right fit when it comes to pursuing a college education.  As youth coaches and parents, we see college recruiting through the lens of ESPN glamour, but in this HBT, we discussed real college preparation with Cindy.

Experience is key for your Recreation or Select Travel Ball athlete

juniorThis is a question that many families struggle with in youth sports.  What is the right experience – Recreation or Select Travel Ball?  Families used to wrestle with this question when their child was around 12 or 13 years old, but now these talks start to take place around the ages of 7, 8, or 9 years old.  It is short sighted to just look at the league each plays in – one must consider the overall experience their athlete will have.

This question leads to many stressful discussions within the family.

This question leads to varying advice from those the family may seek for advice.

This question leads to strong opinions that get displayed on social media or in conversations in which one side of the question degrades the other side.

Here’s an exercise for you to get the true barometer on this question . . . go to Facebook and search Select Ball Has Ruined Our Youth and read one side of the coin. Then, type in Rec Ball Has Softened Our Youth to read the other side of the coin.

First let’s ask – what is the actual difference between rec ball and select ball? Make note of who you ask, because you are going to get a “pro-answer” from them on the side they lobby and vice versa. You will hear things like the cost is different, this one plays tournaments and that one doesn’t, this one has better competition and that one doesn’t, this one supports multi-sport athletes and that one doesn’t. Unfortunately through all the debate everyone is missing the actual important question – what is the right experience my athlete should have.

The key in finding the right experience is establishing goals. Goals #1 should be around the love of the game. Only a healthy experience will provide a true love and passion for anything. Goals around having fun, recreation, and activity for health, competition, life lessons, teamwork, and leadership are all components of a healthy experience. Seek out the right experience, not the right tagline.

As a club, we have looked in to the environments and the experiences that the typical 6, 7, and 8 year olds are having in the game of baseball and softball in our region. Currently, the experiences that 6-8 year olds have in baseball and softball are very inconsistent. Some teams at these ages may:

Head down an aggressive path with burnout right around the corner.

Spend most of the time focused on the games and competition portion but neglect the development and team portion of the sport.

Get together for a small 2-month season and kids are picking 4 leaf clovers in the outfield.

junior2We have designed our Junior program to provide the right experience for 6-8 year olds. It is a club-focused, all-inclusive program that provides the roadmap and monitoring needed to assure the right experience for our athletes and their families. We are not a select organization for 6-8 year olds; we are a club that walks hand in hand with the coaches and families to ensure the right experience in youth sports. The right experience should increase the love of the game for the kids each year they play, it should allow for them to pursue multiple sports building on their athleticism, it should combat burnout with a roadmap and a plan to develop the kids skills year in and year out.

It is time for parents and coaches to ask the right question – what experience do I want for my kid and team? That is a deeper question than – what league should they play (select/rec)?   When we ask families what experience do you want for your child at the age of 7 we get a answer that is genuine, with out the malice and frustration you see out in social media. We hear that the experience people want for their kids is very specific. They want their kids to get better at the game, be a part of a team, have a coach that loves the game, be taught some life lessons through the platform of sports, we want our child to enjoy some games and success, we want them to have fun and to fall in love with the game. That is the model that our Junior program has been built on.

We are working to educate families that the league (rec or select) is not the entire experience. The league your child plays in (rec or select) is only one component of the experience but it doesn’t encompass the needs of the kids entirely. It leaves out the building blocks of sports – the teamwork, the life lessons, and the other characteristics we discussed earlier that are what we want to help families understand. What should your 6, 7, 8 year old do? They should play in a Junior program that follows the correct roadmap built around providing the 3D experience. The 3D experience provides the right physical and mental development at the right age.

Re-cap

Our sports culture has placed labels on different levels of ball (rec, select, AAU, etc.) – these titles do not represent a consistent experience.

Forget the name – pay attention to the experience. Make sure the experience is a building block for the future for your athlete in the sport.

 

SIU-E head softball coach Sandy Montgomery joins Brett Swip to discuss college recruiting

 

The Softball Community welcomes SIU-E head coach Sandy Montgomery who will be joining Brett Swip as they discuss some of the hot topics around college recruiting. This is a free discussion for anyone that would like to attend. These two will have an “open mic” concept as they go back and forth on different recruiting topics, things recruiters see, what they are looking for in athletes, what they see in Midwest Softball and much more. This is simply and come and listen to vital information that comes straight from a D-1 coach, not so much a question and answer session. These two brains are not something you want to miss! This will take place at the VFW in Collinsville.

Montgomery&SwipExtreme

Sandy Montgomery from SIUE,
and Brett Swip from Extreme Baseball & Softball Club.
 
These two coaches will be having an open dialogue session to discuss the Midwest athlete and how they can increase their opportunities to be recruited for college scholarships.
Details

WHEN: Sunday, August 2nd

WHERE: Collinsville VFW, 1234 Vandalia, Collinsville IL 62234
TIME: 7 – 8 pm
COST: FREE
Why You And Your Family Should Be There

Topics To Be Discussed:
  1. Understand firsthand how a college coach evaluates talent
  2. Learn the responsibility of club and select teams in
    developing recruitable players.
  3. Gain perspective on the number of high-level scholarships available each year and how they are distributed Nationally.